Tag Archives: creative

‘We must find meaning in the time we spend online. Are we building our tools with that in mind?” Anil Dash

 

‘We must find meaning in the time we spend online. Are we building our tools with that in mind?” #mozfest @anildash — THAT. AND THAT AGAIN.

— Robert Drummond (@robertd1981) October 27, 2013

 

 

So, I’ve been at the #mozfest for the long weekend, and I’m on the train mulling things over and that idea from Anil Dash, just keeps coming back to me.

I was completely amazed by the ethics of the Mozilla people that just shone through in all aspects of the weekend. I knew I was going to like the geeky stuff, – the Open Badges, the Digital Leaders etc, but the morality of what Mozilla are doing and are trying to do I wasn’t really prepared for. I got that they like open source, I got their ideas around web privacy, but this weekend just showed me that their beliefs are driving the tools they’re creating, the learning they’re facilitating, the teaching they’re doing and the difference they’re making.

I think it was Mark Steel who said that the trouble with public services being provided by bodies who aren’t democratically elected is that they are doing what they do with an agenda. He was looking at the negative sides of this – Right-Wing (or left I guess) groups providing care but with a ‘side’ to it, religious bodies providing education, care etc. I think this weekend #mozfest made me see why they do what they do, what their agenda is.

I take their agenda to be giving people the tools to shape the web (and beyond) to create the web, school, community, that they want to create: Not being held back. Empowerment.

On Saturday morning, Anil Dash spoke about the web, about the way it has evolved (or not) and about the ownership of so much of it by organisations whose interests are profits not people, clicks not change.

And then he talked about how he spends more time on the web, than he does reading to his young son. (What a brave thing to say to an audience), and then the key idea.

If we’re going to spend some much time on the web, we’d better bloody well do something worthwhile with it.

In July I shared this, which pretty much sums up why I teach, ICT, or anything really. It’s about giving the tools to people, empowering them, letting them solve the problems they want and need to solve.

The web has transformed learning as much as the printing press did, and may transform it more. And just as with the first book learning exploded, so it was with the internet. And then… we log into facebook and let facebook show us the web. The power we have is not used.

If we’re going to spend some much time on the web, we’d better bloody well do something worthwhile with it.

So what am I going to do about it.

I’m going to give the young people these tools to shape the web and let it improve their lives, solve their problems, show that differences can be made if that’s what they want.

It’s probably not going to be easy either- obstacles in the way are many, time consuming and frustrating. It may not be popular.

But I’m convinced it’s right.

#Mozfest

I’m waiting to board my train back to Edinburgh, after a brilliant time at Mozfest, so I thought I’d collate some of my thoughts and learning tweets into one place and share them again. As you’ll see there bits that fit together and bits that don’t!

 

Values of the web needs to be a part of digital citizenship learning in schools. #mozfest #dlchat

“We must find meaning in the time we spend online. Are we building our tools with that in mind?” #mozfest #openingkeynote @anildash

#mozfest about building real things for real people.

big theme of #mozfest is giving control and knowledge of the web to the learners and children. Love that idea. #dlchat

If 9 yr olds can be passionate about pollution, they can become passionate about privacy and the web. #mozfest #dlchat

#mozfest stuff I learned. Webmaker is brill and projects allow it to be accessed as cross curricular ICT tool. Kids can make rather than ppt

#mozfest stuff I learned. Badges are close to being school ready. Will pilot use with @makewaves with dig leaders. #dlchat

#mozfest stuff I learned. Mozilla is all about the ethics of the web and we need to cover this in our digital citizenship learning.

#mozfest stuff I learned. Citizen science looks great from what @MobileMaggie said. Love the Serengeti project. That’s real world learning.

#mozfest stuff I learned. Lambic beer. It’s the future. Like sourdough bread, but in a beer format.

#mozfest. Stuff I think. The web ownership debate is important to the kids we teach. It might be the most important bit of citizenship.

#mozfest. Stuff I think. Great point comparing environmental care to web ownership. Kids can get it if we allow them into the debate.

#mozfest. Stuff I think. Tomorrow I will not do badges nor teach the web going to visit the unknown bits of Mozilla.

#mozfest. Stuff I think. The Web Literacy Standards are a great guide for teaching our Primary Children about ICT and their roles with it,

#mozfest. Stuff I think. The WebLit Standards when aligned with webmaker tools and badges will be amazing for kids in schools!

#mozfest. Stuff I think. Pupil council could announce a schedule and any interested school members come along to a hackerspace & work on topic.

#mozfest stuff I think. Hive projects in learning spaces like Uni raises the aspiration of the young as to what they can achieve.

5 Words to describe my class.

If you had to choose five words to describe your class, what would they be? -Dave Burgess
I found this idea and quotation here and thought it was a fantastic idea for teachers, but also a great idea to start the new school year off with a new class.
Messy.
Interactive.
Inquisitive.
Energetic,
Happy.
I wonder what words my class from last year would come up with?
Henti Smith fmgbain
Inquisitive Fascincation – Henti Smith

Thoughts on using Technology in schools.

I came across this via zite which I use to find and share a load of good reading, infographics and ideas. This pretty much sums up my thoughts about using Technology in schools, and is what we should be aiming for when embedding ICT across the curriculum.

As it says at the bottom, it’s a tool not an outcome.

technology

What I want for my pupils and Scottish Education.

My Professional learning plan for the West Lothian Leadership course begins with a section of self-evaluation. The first part of that is thinking about and noting down thoughts about what we want for Scottish Education, our schools, ourselves and our pupils.

Here are my thoughts about what I would like for the pupils I teach. I’d be grateful for any comments, awkward questions etc, as that is the reason I’m posting aspects of my personal learning plan online.

 

What do I want for my pupils and Scottish Education?

 

A Google search reveals lots of articles listing the things that our young people should develop in their education to succeed in the now and the future. Feel free to have a search yourself, there’s thousands of links to interesting reads. Many of these articles contain similar skills and ideas such as critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication, ability to collaborate (which I find in practice means having a lot of ‘self-esteem chips’ as Richard Gerver calls them), adaptability and more. What these lists don’t contain in 2013 is much in the way of facts and figures (knowledge) – these being at our fingertips now. (The key skills for using facts and figures tend to be knowledge of how to internet search for them, a bit of curiosity and some source checking skills).

 

I want all of the above for the children I work with – who wouldn’t. However I believe that there are three key ideas which open up the rest of the ideas, and for me these are the things I believe are vital to education, Scottish or otherwise. These ideas will also allow our children to develop as societies themselves develop over time.

 

1. I want children to be inquisitive and curious and that means they need to enjoy their learning.

 

2. I want children to ask good questions of themselves, their peers and the adults in their lives.

 

3. I want children to have loads of self-confidence. This means they can develop their collaborative work, can accept having their work held to peer review and can develop better their own work.

 

If a child leaves my class/time with me with these three things, then I think they will be well placed for their future, wherever it may go.

Death Valley National Park, California (8)Death Valley by Ken Lund

Learning Spaces.

An area I wanted to develop this term in class was my use of displays. I feel ‘traditional’ primary school displays are not a natural strength of mine, and I’ve always wondered about the effectiveness of the display in effecting children’s learning. I’m open to any researched ideas about the effects if you’d like to post in the comments or e-mail me I’d be grateful.

In March time I came across No Tosh’s posts on learning spaces and was really interested in some of the ideas in the post. I was particularly interested in the learning wall idea, and set about creating one in my class using plastic wallets to display the children’s work in a respectful manner as well as allowing the much needed fluidity for the display’s success.

We launched our topic in April, Beavers – back after 400 years, and I explained the ideas to the children, and waited…and waited…and waited. Well this week we had a bit of a breakthrough. A couple of children brought work in on Tuesday, a couple more on Wednesday and today I had a child asking to stay in through lunchtime to create her work for the display. I have to say I am delighted that the idea seems to be taking off. I hope to have more work to add to the display coming in thick and fast now.

How does it compare to ‘traditional’ displays? Well, the children are very interested by what is on the display and clearly as work is beginning to come in they are motivated by what they see and want to copy, build on and develop their peers work. Could this happen on a ‘traditional’ display? Well yes it could, but my experience (and/or lack of artistic eye) means through my career it hasn’t happened as much as I’d have liked, and certainly not as much as the time and physical resources used in a display should have impacted. It is certainly something I will be using again next school year and I hope it will have the same motivational effect.

Here is the work the children have created to date.

 

 

Why might sharing and publishing in the open be advantageous?

This is one of a series of blog posts from #teachtheweb course. My other posts can be found at Teacher, teach thyself.

The creator controls what of their work is seen or heard, by whom, where and when.

 

In my opinion sharing and publishing have never been easier, nor more accessible for all of us. We share photos through Instagram, Facebook and Flickr, we can share ideas through blog writing, tweeting and facebook, we can share pretty much all aspects of our daily life and it’s only going to get easier.

 

Who do we share with? Close friends, less close friends, colleagues from work or education, people from around the world. Pretty much anyone we want who has some level of open and available internet access.

 

We can also produce more formal pieces of publishing such as e-books and ‘real’ books through tools such as Lulu.

 

In my early lifetime, sharing meant meeting up with someone, sending something via the post, photocopying pieces of paper and the thought of publishing your own writing was a pipe dream – it was in the hands of newspaper editors or book publishers. They decided what was to be seen, not the user and certainly not the ‘receiver’ of the information.

 

The user can access more content than before, and more easily.

 

If I wish to find some writing about a subject it is easy. I use the web and search engines and find lots of information in a variety of forms. This is a brilliant, as work which previously I would have been excluded from accessing due to cost and geographical restrictions is know available and most often for no or minimal cost. Secondly, it’s easily searchable (whilst acknowledging google organises things in a google search initially) I can use some advanced search techniques to precisely access the materials I would like.

 

The user can choose how to acknowledge the creator.

 

If I buy a book, I have acknowledged the creator(s) up front by paying. If the work is not of a standard I desire, or if it is an incredible life changing book the acknowledgement is the same – £15.

 

I’ve also paid an amount which is set by some 3rd parties – publishers, shops as well as the creator. It’s probably fair to say that if I pay £15 for a book, the creator will not recieve £15.

 

If I am accessing something via the open web, I can choose how I acknowledge the work – I can tweet the link to the work, I can access the creator directly via a comments section, I can pay some money via paypal in some cases (I choose if and how much of course), or I can write a response myself citing the original work on my own spaces.

 

The collaboration possibilities are endless.

 

It’s a reasonable assumption that if you are spending your non work time writing/creating and sharing works for free, it is something you are passionate about. By sharing these things in the ‘open’ format, you are likely to connect to people with similar passions. The greatest working groups I have worked in are the ones where the members have shared goals or passions. The work created in these groups has been of a high quality

 

The effect of your passion being shared with liked minded individuals is a massive gain. It allows you to work together (virtually or real) to create more pieces and connect with a wider audience, it lets you see how other people with similar passions are creating and can give you hope that you’re not alone.

 

And yet…

 

There are examples of work practices being used which stop or limit openness and sharing. Some planning programs in school only allow printed copies and copies within the format of their (paid) software, meaning the work created in them cannot be shared easily. Some education intranet sites allow access only to members of their community, excluding a huge range of educators from contributing and making the process of sharing work on those intranet more laborious than it should/needs to be. It would be interesting to know what the thinking is behind these decisions being imposed as I feel the benefits of openness and sharing are huge.

Questions?

I really like the idea of using open ended questions as a starter for lessons and often use the Thunks website from Independent Thinking. I found a new site which I called Thought Questions  which has questions in a similar vein although the questions on there are often a bit deeper. They could certainly lead to good ‘citizenship’ and PSHE discussions. There are also some lovely images which go with each question.

I am going to use the images from the site to create an interactive thinking display in my room. The questions will be in the middle of the display and the children will  add their answers/ideas on post-it notes around the display.

Have a look at the site and see what you think.

Apple Smoking In The Darkness

Make Things Do Stuff

NESTA, Nominet Trust and Mozilla have create the website Make Things Do Stuff, with the following aim.

Make Things Do Stuff aims to mobilise the next generation of digital makers.

I’ve just had a quick look around their site but it looks great. There are a lot of projects on their which Digital Leaders will love, but which could also be developed in the classroom too. Have a look and see what you think.

http://www.makethingsdostuff.co.uk

Cranes In The Sky.

 

Weeknotes…what happened?

I did think when I began my weeknotes that it could be an ambitious thing to try and write something once a week, and sure enough as term progressed and I got more tired, I got less productive and weeknotes weren’t written.

 

So, what did I do in the last 3 to 4 weeks.

  • P4/5 and P5 had their Dr Who showcase which brought the Dr Who topic to a conclusion. The work the children put into that (which was fantastic) can be seen on our pages on the school blog. There are still a few more scratch games to post up on there too. The topic inspired 2 children to create this wonderful drama at home!
  • The digital leaders never quite completed their podcast – I think a combination of Audacity and windows XP proved insurmountable for them. We will try again using the ‘Voice record’ app on the iOS systems. This looks to be a great app and much more friendly that Audacity, although not as high-end.
  • Ukulele news… The Girl has a electro-acoustic tenor. (Envy, jealousy etc) Looks great and sounds fantastic! I’m still playing away on my Uke and am trying to finger pick a bit.
  • Cooking – I made Easter Sunday dinner for the family. Lamb Shanks from the Ruhlman’s Twenty book (which is wonderful, never made anything bad from this book) and a Quorn alternative for The Girl and me. I also made a poppy seed torte from the Guardian cook which was dreadful.
  • Comic relief day in school was very successful – well done to Pupil Council, your ideas were brilliant. Again the school blog is the place to see photos of the day.
  • I used Mailstrom to re-organise my gmail account and have achieved Inbox zero, and not gone beyond 10 e-mails in my inbox since! Great program.
  • I made it to the Easter holidays, it was a tiring term and I’m not really feeling human yet, but I made it which I am really pleased about.

 

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