Tag Archives: games based learning

Coding…

There’s a lot of talk, documentation and directive about coding in schools currently. My opinion is that it’s something that can be learned by children, can be taught by teachers and for some of our children (like all subjects) it will be ‘their thing’ for life.

How to learn coding…there is another question.

I was lucky enough to come across Erase All Kittens at Mozfest last year and Doug Belshaw nudged it my way again in his weekly newsletter.

It’s a great program which introduces coding to children in the form of a game. To complete the game, you alter the code of the game itself. (For example, you can’t jump that chasm, alter the jump parameter, or the size of the chasm from the code). E.A.K. shows you where to change the code and suggests the change you might make.

The developers are keen to get children testing their program out and keen to observe what children make of it in person.

Children should enjoy this approach and find it a good introduction to coding and programming. Have a look, and see if you and your class might use it.

 


 

5 Words to describe my class.

If you had to choose five words to describe your class, what would they be? -Dave Burgess
I found this idea and quotation here and thought it was a fantastic idea for teachers, but also a great idea to start the new school year off with a new class.
Messy.
Interactive.
Inquisitive.
Energetic,
Happy.
I wonder what words my class from last year would come up with?
Henti Smith fmgbain
Inquisitive Fascincation – Henti Smith

IT – What I want to see

Before heading off to #3mhothouse I’d been thinking about what I want IT to be for our pupils in the near future.

I want it to be an enabler. To allow children to create things they couldn’t otherwise, and produce professional quality products.

I want children to be good citizens in life and extend this into their online world. They need to see the benefits of social media/networking and respect both the people and the media. I would love them to be ambassadors for the good things young people can do with social media and battle some of the negativity that some traditional media writes about them.

I want IT to be enjoyable if it is being taught as a discrete lesson. Too many Fridays my step-daughter has come home moaning about how dull IT lessons were at school and then proceeded to spend 4 hours creating, curating and interacting wonderfully on the computer at home.

I don’t want IT to be limited by age or stage. I do not want a scheme of work where 7 year olds change font style, and 8 year olds change font colour. It will show a progression of sorts, but that will not be tied to ages.

I want IT to be chosen by children for a task. Another tool in the learning bag. Alongside this children need to be introduced to the vast range of tools which are available, so they know that you don’t have to use powerpoint for every presentation, nor kidpix for each piece of art. Fine tuning of tool selection will be vital.

As I think of more ideas and try to rough out an ICT framework for school I may add to this piece.

I’d be delighted if you added any ideas of your own.

 

 

The Social Evolution of Gaming.

I found this great, thought provoking infographic via @tombarrett. I found the stat about 25% of gamers playing with their spouse OR parent particularly interesting. It would be great to see gaming as more of a family thing – I used to play loads of card games, board games, subbuteo etc with my family when I was growing up. It was a huge amount of fun and lead to great social learning experiences.

 

I think it would be good to create some kind of parent/child gaming experience through school – maybe using some of the Consolarium’s kit which @derekrobertson has available for loan.

I’ll have a think about how we could do this. For now I’ll enjoy the infographic.

Wii Sports for Mean, Mode and Median.

This first appeared on January 23rd 2010 on my old blog. I’m re-posting some material which I have salvaged from that mysteriously disappered blog here. I hope you find it useful

 

My final lesson of the week to involve the Wii used the practice option for batting on Wii sports baseball. I decided that I wanted to create a larger range of numbers for the children to find the median number of. Wii sports baseball batting practice allows you to have 10 swings at 10 pitches. It records (quite quickly) what the distance is that you hit it. It was this data we recorded for our averages lesson. As with the bowling, there were 10 numbers to record, meaning we had to split the 5th and 6th numbers to find the median. After a discussion about the best way to do this, we managed quite well and got better at it as we progressed through the tables taking their turns at batting.

The children were by now quite good at finding the mean and mode for the range of numbers. One of the more interesting discussions we had whilst using the Wii for averages, was the way the modal average differed between the bowling game and the baseball game. In the bowling game, the mode was 10, and the mean average score was frequently around 9. The children could clearly see that the mode and mean were closely related in that scenario. However, despite some of my group being ace sluggers, (the record was 7 homers out of 10 attempts!), the mode for each set distances was 0. This was not close to the mean average, which was around 110m.We briefly discussed the reasons behind this and talked about which average is most useful in which situations.

One final thought about the Wii bowling. The scoring of bowling is quite complex when spares and strikes are involved (which with my class they always seemed to be) I wonder i there is some maths to be investigated  in how the scores are made, maybe with a secondary class devising new scoring methods for bowling and using the Wii bowling game to see how they would work, comparing the scoring methods with each other. The children throughout the week certainly enjoyed our use of the Wii, and they seem to have learned how to calculate the mean, mode and median averages for a set of numbers. An enjoyable and productive week in maths.

By The Library of Congress 

Primary Games Arena.

The Primary Games Arena is a site which contains lots of games aimed at children in the primary age range. There are games for a wide range of subject areas aimed at learners right across the primary years. The games are available on android mobile format, ps3 and wii (which my class feel adds to the ‘cool’ factor).

Have a look at the site and see what you think.

The link is http://primarygamesarena.com/# 

Primary_school_games_fun_curriculum_games

Wii Sports for Mean, Mode and Median

This first appeared on January 17th 2010 on my old blog. I’m re-posting some material which I have salvaged from that mysteriously disappered blog here. I hope you find it useful

 

I’m teaching averages this week with my maths group and I decided yesterday to begin the week by using wii sports bowling to create the data for is to work with. I first came across the idea of using the wii for maths through Tom Barrett’s Site and from Tom’s interesting ways. I know the children will enjoy using the wii – it’s always the most popular choice in Golden Time, so that part of the plan seems fine. I also know from assessment of the group that they need to learn about averages. Averages can tend to be a once or twice a year topic so I thought using the wii would make it memorable and thus allow the children to recall their learning easily. I’m going to split my group into 8 groups of 3, and then into 4 groups of 6. These groups will then be the 4 teams for bowling, with each team member bowling consecutively on their team. The teams will each have to fill in a scoresheet for each bowl from every team. This will just record the total for both throws (not the actual bowling score with strikes and spares). From round 2 onwards we will calculate in each team, the mean, median and modal score for the entire game. One member from each team will then write their answers on the board. If the team gets all 3 answers correct I will award 5 more pins to their team score in the final total at the end (or on the excel on the IWB, not sure yet!) We will do this until the game is complete. I need to think about where I position the wii and TV in the class and how to place the tables I will have to move. I need space for the bowlers and space to let the group see the events. I need access to the chalk board for teams to write their averages up and also space for them to work without other groups overhearing them! I’m really looking forward to it, let’s see what happens! 

 

AttributionNoncommercial Some rights reserved by SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent)

Low-tech mental oral starter 2

Another popular low-tech starter is a version of the memory game ‘I went shopping.’ In the maths version children take it in turns to say

‘I went shopping with £x.xx and I bought something (let the children choose, it adds to the fun) that cost £x.xx, what change should I get.’

This activity lends itself to circle time maths and pretty much to any age groups which have worked with money. Older children could add the ideas of a % discount or price rises too. The children will really enjoy making up problems to extend their friends maths skills!

Low-tech mental oral starter!

Just a quick post. I got reminded listening to my partner’s daughter this evening that the most interesting and effective things in teaching can also be the simplest.

Her maths teacher uses a variation of the ’11’ game to practice counting down, through hundred barriers.  To play you would stand up all the class and begin with a random child and a number near a hundreds barrier (214 for example). Each child subtracts either 1,2 or3 numbers from 214 until some child says 197. The child who says 197 sits down and are out. So a sample game might go,

214,213,212,

211,210,

209,208,207,

206,205,

204,203,202

201,200,

199,198

197 OUT!

You play until only one person is left in.

You can also use an extension to this game. That is for the winning player’s table to get a reward of house points etc. The children then have to use a planning strategy to try to keep their table’s members in.

I’ll be giving it a go with my maths class tomorrow!

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